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Old 07-17-2007   #1
Frankenstein
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Default I want to become a great genius in mathematics from which subject shall i...

...start reading? i mean from which subject in math shall i start reading.can you give me the order of subjects in math.i cannot directly go to advanced topics from which topics should i start and end with
 
Old 07-17-2007   #2
paducah_billy
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Start with basic algebra, then trig, then calcus, matrix theory, and might as well put a little quantumn theory in there.I would think you would have to be born a genius not make your self one.
 
Old 07-17-2007   #3
tastywheat
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Try the following sequence:- arithmetic- algebra- geometry- trigonometry- calculus- multivariable calculus- discrete math- linear algebra- abstract algebra- differential equations- statistics- complex ****ysis- differential geometry- combinatorics
 
Old 07-17-2007   #4
jcurrieii
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Advanced math.There are literally hundreds of "sub fields" in math...some bearing about as much relation to basic math, and an ostrich does with a woodpecker.
 
Old 07-17-2007   #5
Chuck Schwarzenegger
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first of all, genius means you are born with the ability. if you are not born, or developed at a very early age, you might not be a genius, but you can always work hard at to become extremely proficient at it. if you are really interested in math, you need to go from ground up. learn the basic first, get your algebra back and forth, both discrete and complex. go up from there, to calculus, differential equation, multivariables... don't just spend your time reading stuff, you won't learn math that way at all, trust me. do a lot of sample problems, a lot of them. remember, you need to know how to walk before you can run.
 
Old 07-17-2007   #6
popeye
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you do not mention which level you are at right now, but in you school stuff, go to the most difficult problems and solve them.Its not about reading, its about understanding and problem solving.University mathematics needs a good foundation in set theory and logic. Read about Mathematical ****ysis, and number theory before you do them it will be an advantage, but definitely give yourself a good foundation in set theory and logic.
 
Old 07-17-2007   #7
natarajan l
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All genius in mathematics are born like that and did not try to become one nor asking in yahoo to become one.
 
Old 07-17-2007   #8
wolverine205
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The levels start with the gradeschool levels, and are just titled by the grade level until high school. In high school, there are many choices for math courses, but they are usually dictated by your level of understanding after you have completed 8th grade math. After 8th grade, the levels are as follows: Pre-Algebra; a very basic math course covering primarily the same topics with approximately the same level of difficulty as 8th grade math, Algebra; a basic math course focusing in the order of operations with subtraction, addition, division, multiplication, exponents, and square roots, also covers topics with variable substitution and double variable graphing (X,Y coordinate), Geometry; a math course focusing on shapes and their definitions, along with more advanced properties of the shapes (I felt that this was a completely useless course, because it focused so much on the definitions of the shapes and angles, that it turned into more of an english course for me), Advanced Algebra/Algebra 2; An advanced course focusing on the same points as basic algebra, but using matrices, many variables, parabolic and hyperbolic graphing, and advanced theories will be introduced and studied (extremely useful course, because it can be applied to so many things in real life- if you feel you have mastered basic algebra, then skip geometry and start here), FST/Functions Statistics and Trigonometry; a very advanced course using advanced solving tactics such as factoring with multiple exponents and variables, and continuing the education of Algebra 2, FST will delve into the most advanced types of educational mathematics to challenge the stundent to learn quickly and eficiently (this is a great pre-college course, especially if you take it at the honors level, but it will be extremely useful nonetheless), Pre-Calculus; this course uses mathematics and methods for solving from real life situations to show the student practical ways to apply their knowlege in still more advanced ways than FST (a good course, but it promises a bit more than it offers: however, a great course when partnered with physics), Calculus; a far more advanced version of Pre-Calculus (an understatement-you have to totally master Pre-Calculus before you even attempt Calculus, especially if you are taking Calculus courses in a college environment in stead of a high school. My schedule: 4th through 7th grade, I took each math class a year ahead of time (eg. 6th grade math in 5th grade), 8th grade; Algebra for the first 6 months, Geometry for the last 3 and 1 into the summer, by special allowance by my math teacher, freshman (9th); Algebra 2 (advanced), I was placed in a class where the students that it contained were primarily sophomores and juniors, all of them expected to do very well, because they were all honors students- I finished 3rd in a class of 36, with one other student who was the only other two-years-advanced student, a 4.0 gpa student, finishing second, sophomore year (10th); FST (advanced), the exact same results as algebra 2, but i came in 5th in a class of nearly all seniors, and the 4.0 student came in 6th. I am now in my Junior year in High school, getting ready to take Calculus, and possibly a second course through nearby college- psychology, sociology, etc.
 
 

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