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Old 07-24-2007   #1
smacal1072
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Default Best Math Courses for Engineering?

I'm a BS Physics major in my last year. I've got Calc 1-3, ODE, some PDE and vector calc under my belt. I want to take one more math course that applies to engineering. What should I take? (linear algebra, stats, numerical ****ysis etc...)
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Old 07-24-2007   #2
jgelfritz
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Definitely complex ****ysis or numerical ****ysis if you only can only take one class. Linear algebra would be appropriate too if you're not already familiar with it. I would recommend complex variables though.
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Old 07-24-2007   #3
tlbs101
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Take either linear algebra or numerical ****ysis. Stats aren't eused much on a day-to-day basis in most engineering disciplines.I took both LA and NA in college (along with all the others you mentioned, except PDE). NA has come in handy on occasion..
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Old 07-24-2007   #4
jonsmarth
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Linear algebra is probably your best bet here. That is very often an area that engineering students are lacking in. However, stats can be very useful and is used in experimental ****ysis. Numerical ****ysis is useful too, but the others are probably better to have if you cant take all 3.
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Old 07-24-2007   #5
dr_tom_cruise_md
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Take the stats course to give you a head start in reliability engineering. Chances are you will never use linear algebra or numerical ****ysis in day-to-day engineering.
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Old 07-24-2007   #6
hanksimon
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I recommend stats. If you get a good prof, then he will improve your reasoning and evaluation skills.As a BS, you will probably want to get an MS, or maybe an MBA. A PhD is nice, but not worth the money in today's job market, altho needed for teaching. The math that you take depends on the engineering that you're interested in. Most Engineers in industry work as Systems Engineers. There are lots of other engineering disciplines, but they can be grouped generally as probelm solvers in the Systems Engineering realm.If you want to explore something on the forefront, look into Engineering Economics. This is NOT the economics of engineering, so be careful when you look it up. No, it is the balance and trade of engineering decisions, using the tools of economics.Interesting tidbit: the only folks who know more math than mathematicians ... are Economists ! Physicists typically learn only the math that they need for their speciality, even if it is hydropneumatics, Quantum, or Gravity... but they deal with real data. Economists have to learn all of these math methods to build their models... because they don't always have reality and data to start with... they try to extrapolate from the model to reality.
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Old 07-24-2007   #7
J w
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If you want to be a civil or mechanical engineer you really need a class in Finite Element ****ysis.But since your physics you probably want to be an electrical engineer. If my assuming is right, you would benefit from a Complex ****ysis class and it should probably be easy for you beause you have PDE's.In my final contingency, if you are thinking about manufacturing engineering then it is critical that you have at least one intensive statistics course.
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